Home Jazz Faculty Lecture Focused on Jazz Dance History and Racism in the United States – SALVEtoday

Faculty Lecture Focused on Jazz Dance History and Racism in the United States – SALVEtoday

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McKillop Library will host another faculty conference with Lindsay Guarino, Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Music, Theater and Dance. Titled “Whiteness and the Fractured Jazz Dance Continuum,” the talk will explore how jazz dance, an Indigenous American art form rooted in Black American people and culture, is often mislabeled and misunderstood.

The conference will take place on Thursday, October 6 from 4 to 5:30 p.m. on the first floor of the McKillop Library. To register for the event, go here.

Guarino edited “Rooted Jazz Dance” which focuses on the themes that will inspire his lecture.

Arguing that the history of jazz dance is intertwined with the history of racism in the United States of America, Guarino will present the obscure history of how normalized whiteness permeated the form so that today , performers and audiences unknowingly participate in an erroneous appropriation of art. Capital city. To see jazz clearly, one must deconstruct historical narratives by considering who the storytellers were, what biases may have been present, and what parts of the narrative were left behind.

To that end, Guarino will share his research on how Africanist aesthetics and cultural values ​​are the foundation of American jazz but have been historically devalued and systematically invisible. She will also provide specific examples of how and where jazz dance separated from its black American roots.

By tracing jazz from its roots in West Africa, to its origins in African-American culture, and to its myriad manifestations today, one can see more clearly how jazz reflects and subverts American values. and offers unlimited potential to better understand the complexity of American identity.

Guarino is an artist, educator and scholar. She facilitated the dramatic growth of the dance program, including its new major focused on jazz studies. Guarino’s historical and embodied research interrogates the impacts of whiteness on jazz history and practice through an anti-racist lens, and investigates the intersections of jazz pedagogy, Africanist aesthetics, history, American identity and culture.

As an educator and leader, Guarino prioritizes community at the heart of her practice and seeks to cultivate spaces where individuality is celebrated and recognized as essential to personal and collective growth.

The conference will take place on Thursday, October 6 from 4 to 5:30 p.m. on the first floor of the McKillop Library. To register for the event, go here.